SPL Hand Coloured Rare Book Collection Featuring Norman R Bobins

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HONE, William.
CRUIKSHANK, George.(illus)
The Man in the Moon.

A politically radical pamphlet, The Man in the Moon was published in 1820 - a time of heightened political tensions following the Peterloo Massacre of August 1819 where peaceful protestors for political reform were killed and hundreds injured. In response, the government passed the repressive 'Six Acts' that compromised freedom of speech and quelled reformist or radical political activity. This excerpt from The Man in the Moon, with its reference to 'steel lozenges' and depiction of cavalrymen attacking protestors, alludes to the Peterloo Massacre. On the right, the Prince Regent, Church, and Army hold hands with the devil as they dance around a burning printing press - a symbol of liberty and progress for radicals. Although published anonymously, William Hone is believed to be the author; illustrations are by George Cruikshank, a frequent collaborator during this period.

Published
London: William Hone, 1820.
References
Cohn, 527.- Patten I, 168-169
Plates
10
Binding/Size
S=8vo
Value
0-5000
Published
London: William Hone, 1820.
Ref
868

Plaquette in-8 de (8) ff. [sur 11], broch. Limp pictorial paper covers, wrapped in tissue, protected by a purpose-made 'Solander' box of 1/4 morocco over marbled boards, with gilt lettering and decoration to spine. Coloured wood-cut illustrations. Good condition. Coloured plates in order: 1. Title page. 2. A Royal Procession. 3. The King carried in the style of a 'Sedan Chair.' 4. Royal Coat of Arms. 5. A man is almost bent double under the weight of his cargo; another man is adding to his load. 6. Royal Guards feeding (forcefully) the populace 'Steel Lozenges'. 7. A bonfire around which the devil, clergymen, and military commanders dance. 8. Men destroying a printing press, while a lone lady tries (in vain) to defend it from them. 9. The King shoots a 'Blunderbuss' sitting on a man's back and supported from behind by another. 10. End-piece illustration.